Research

“They (certain birds) don’t participate in this behavior during the breeding season because their energy is geared towards producing and raising young birds. It probably happens in the winter because there is power in numbers in terms of avoiding predators. The crazy swirling effort by thousands at dusk is likely a way to confuse any nearby predators such as hawks and owls.”

Dr. Michael K. Steinberg, associate professor in New College, discussing flocks of swirling birds at dusk (AL.com)

“I suspect it is because political leaders often attempt policy change that is too extreme when they have unified control of legislature and executive branch. They don’t expect to have to compromise. But it often turns out that there are intra-party disagreements.”