UA’s May Interim Session Offers Variety of Unusual Classes

  • May 6th, 2016

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Professors at The University of Alabama are offering a number of thought-provoking and unusual classes during UA’s May Interim session, which runs from Monday, May 9, through Friday, May 27. Classes include:

“Event Planning: Wedding Coordinator”: Students will plan and execute a mock wedding. The wedding is tentatively scheduled for Wednesday, May 25, with a place and time announced later. Contact: Kimberly A. Boyle, assistant professor of restaurant, hotel and meetings management, kboyle@ches.ua.edu.

“Handmade Nation: Knitting and History”: Knitting: It’s not a hobby — it’s a post-apocalyptic life skill. Students will learn to knit while they explore the history, art and politics of knitting and other handcrafts as a window onto “women’s work” and “men’s work” before and after the Industrial Revolution, federal recognition of Native American tribes and the rise of DIY activism and environmentally sustainable consumption. Contact: Dr. Heather Miyano Kopelson, assistant professor of history, heather.m.kopelson@ua.edu.

“Mad Men & American Culture”: This course considers the recent show “Mad Men” and how it informs viewers of 1960s American culture. While exploring the true human nature beneath the guise of 1960s traditional family values, “Mad Men” strips away preconceived notions and romanticized views of the time period. Through viewing and conducting close readings of episodes of the show, class members will examine the historical moments and cultural trends of the era and how they still impact us today. Contact: Dr. Emma Bertolaet, New College instructor, at ejbertolaet@crimson.ua.edu, or 850/339-4334.

“Special Topics in Literature: Discworld”: This course examines the universe as Terry Pratchett reconstructed it in the Discworld fantasy novels. In this series, the recurring characters and twisting plots often mirror or rewrite the complexities of every social construct and issue of the modern world: gender, racism and xenophobia, war, religion, technology and others. Students will be encouraged to explore these characters, both sincere and hilarious, and the satire that made a flat disc travelling on the back of a giant turtle into such a recognizable world. Contact: Andrea Barton, assistant director of undergraduate studies, department of English, at abarton3@ua.edu

Contact

Richard LeComte, media relations, rllecomte@ur.ua.edu, 205/348-3782

The University of Alabama, the state’s oldest and largest public institution of higher education, is a student-centered research university that draws the best and brightest to an academic community committed to providing a premier undergraduate and graduate education. UA is dedicated to achieving excellence in scholarship, collaboration and intellectual engagement; providing public outreach and service to the state of Alabama and the nation; and nurturing a campus environment that fosters collegiality, respect and inclusivity.