UAct

Click here for a definition of hazing and for additional information on UA’s Code of Student Conduct, state law, examples and resources. Failure to report hazing is a violation of the law. It is a violation of the Code of Student Conduct if a student retaliates against another student for reporting hazing to UA officials.

Where can I find University policies related to hazing? 
http://ua.edu/about/policies/hazing
http://www.hazing.ua.edu

Isn’t hazing just about initiation into a group? 
Hazing may be misrepresented as fun or a time-honored tradition. It is neither.  Hazing is any completed or attempted action, inaction, situation created, or communication that recklessly or intentionally harms or threatens or is intended to harm or threaten the mental or physical health or safety of a student or individual, or any completed or attempted act that destroys, or removes public or private property, for the purpose of, among other things, initiation, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in, a group or organization.

Remember that hazing is really about power and control, and is abusive. What seem to be minor incidents of hazing must be reported and addressed. If not, these small incidents can lead to serious, dangerous forms of hazing.

What types of behavior could be considered hazing? 
Hazing actions include, but are not limited to the following acts involving other individuals or any attempt to take the following actions:

  • Unreasonable interference with a student's academic performance.
  • Forced actions or inactions that demean or disgrace an individual.
  • Forced or coerced consumption of food, alcohol, drugs, or any other substance.
  • Forced or coerced actions that violate the law or the Code of Student Conduct.
  • Forced or coerced wearing of inappropriate apparel.
  • Forced or coerced exclusion from social contact.
  • Creation of unnecessary fatigue, which includes, but is not limited to, physical activity or deprivation of sleep.
  • Deprivation of food.
  • Any unnecessary physical contact, including, but not limited to, beating, paddling or forced exercises.
  • Personal servitude.
  • Unreasonable exposure to weather or the elements.
  • Any other activity that could be viewed as subjecting others to embarrassment, degradation or humiliation.

How can I report hazing?

  • If this is an emergency or you or someone you know needs assistance immediately, please contact the UA Police Department at 205-348-5454.
  •  Hazing & Harassment Hotline 205-348-HALT (4258)
  • Office of the Dean of Students 205-348-3326
  • Office of Student Conduct 205-348-8234 Email: student.conduct@sa.ua.edu
  • You may also submit a report online using the form at www.hazing.ua.edu.

Can I report hazing that I think is happening to someone else? 
Yes.  You should report any suspected hazing that you believe in good faith has occurred or will occur. 

Can I be protected from retaliation for making a report?
It is a violation of the Student Code of Conduct for a student to retaliate against any individual who makes a good faith report of hazing. Similarly, any University employee who retaliates against an individual who has made a good faith report of hazing will be subject to disciplinary sanctions, up to and including termination.

Can I make an anonymous report? 
Yes, you can report hazing anonymously. However, anonymous reports complicate the University’s ability  to take appropriate action against the individuals and/or organization.

What if I don’t want to make a report
Hazing is a crime in Alabama (Alabama Code § 16-1-23). The University of Alabama prohibits hazing, in any form, of any member of the University community.

What else can I do? 
If you have been hazed, know someone who may have been hazed, or have a good faith belief of hazing that is scheduled to occur, take action. Don't be a bystander.

Call 911 if there is an immediate threat to your safety or the safety of others.

  • REPORT the hazing, anonymously if you prefer.
  • Stay connected with friends outside of the group. Groups that haze often try to isolate their new members from others who might challenge them to question what they are going through.
  • Talk with others about what you are going through. You do not have to keep it a secret. Demanding secrecy is a common practice designed to protect people who are abusing others. You have a right to tell anyone anything you want about what you are going through, even if you were made to promise that you would not tell. Talking with others may save yourself or others from harm.
  • Seek guidance from your parents/guardian, other family members, trusted friends, or university officials.
  • Refuse to participate. Others before you have done so.
  • Join together with other new members to refuse to be hazed. There is power in numbers.
  • Leave the group. This is hard to do, but it is always an option. Walking away from hazing takes strength. Don't believe it if anyone tries to tell you that it is sign of weakness or that you weren't tough enough to take it. Quitting when you are being hazed takes character, courage, and integrity. There are likely others in the group that will leave with you but need someone like you to take the first step.
  • Talk to a health care provider or mental health professional to help you sort out what to do.

WHERE CAN I FIND UNIVERSITY POLICIES RELATED TO TITLE IX?  
For more information regarding Title IX and relevant University policies, see www.titleix.ua.edu.

ISN’T TITLE IX JUST ABOUT WOMEN’S SPORTS? 
No. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a comprehensive federal law that prohibits discrimination based on the gender of students and employees of educational institutions that receive federal financial assistance. 

WHAT TYPES OF BEHAVIOR DOES TITLE IX COVER?

  • Gender discrimination in any educational program or activity, including athletics; recruitment, admissions, financial aid and scholarships; course offerings and access; counseling; hiring and retention of employees; and benefits and leave.
    • Title IX protects all students from sexual violence, regardless of the sex of the alleged perpetrator or complainant, including when they are members of the same sex. Title IX prohibits discrimination based on gender identity or failure to conform to stereotypical notions of masculinity or femininity. The actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity of the parties does not change the University’s obligations. Therefore, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students and employees are protected from discrimination, harassment, sexual assault and sexual violence.
  • Sexual harassment including unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission to such conduct is made, either explicitly or implicitly, a term or condition of employment or academic advancement; (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment or academic decisions; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s performance as an employee or student or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or learning environment.
  • Sexual assault misconduct is any form of sexual contact without the consent of all parties involved to include:
    • a. Sexual intercourse committed by physical force, coercion, threat or intimidation, actual or implied by a person or persons known or unknown to the victim.
    • b. Attempted intercourse, sexual contact, or physical force of a threatening nature expressed or implied that places a person in fear of immediate death or physical injury known or unknown to the victim.
    • c. All other forms of sexual misconduct, which violates state and/or federal law now or subsequently in effect including, but not limited to, conduct defined as rape, sodomy, sexual abuse or sexual contact and contributing to the delinquency of a minor. A person may be deemed not to have knowingly and voluntarily consented if, at the time of the offense, the person is incapable of giving consent because of mental incapacitation, physical impairment, alcohol or drug consumption, or loss of consciousness.
  • Sexual violence including dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.

CAN I BE PROTECTED FROM RETALIATION FOR MAKING A REPORT? 
Yes. It is a violation of federal law and University policy to retaliate against any person making a complaint about a Title IX violation or against any person cooperating with a related investigation. For these purposes, “retaliation” includes harassment, intimidation, threats, coercion, or any materially adverse harm that would dissuade a reasonable student or employee from filing a complaint or participating in an investigation.

WILL MY REPORT BE CONFIDENTIAL? 
Conversations with harassment resource persons, the Title IX Coordinator, or any member of the faculty or staff* of the University are kept as confidential as possible, but information about incidents of sexual misconduct must be shared with relevant administrators if the University needs to take action for reasons of community safety. In all cases, the wishes of the person initiating the conversation are given full consideration.

*Confidential Resources: Employees who qualify for the confidentiality privilege by law will maintain strict confidentiality in all circumstances. These include employees at the Women’s Resource Center and the University Counseling Center and other mental health professionals. Reporting discrimination or sexual misconduct through such employees will not serve as notice to the University to address the alleged discrimination or misconduct.

The Women’s Resource Center may share aggregate data (i.e., total clients served) to funding or other relevant sources. The Women’s Resource Center will also share non-identifying client and victimization information to comply with campus safety and security regulations mandated through the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act and the Higher Education Opportunity Act. In addition, exceptions to client/counselor confidentiality include client disclosures of suspected or known child abuse, homicidal or suicidal ideation, or other circumstances provided for under the law regarding safety and immanent threats.

WHAT SAFETY MEASURES OR RESOURCES ARE AVAILABLE TO INDIVIDUALS INVOLVED IN A TITLE IX INVESTIGATION? 
The Title IX Office may provide accommodations to all individuals involved in a Title IX Investigation. These include but are not limited to medical services, counseling services, academic support, housing support, protective orders, safety planning, employment assistance, and filing of Student Conduct complaints. Additionally, the Title IX Office will assist complainants in notifying UAPD or local law enforcement if the assistance of law enforcement is requested by the complainant.

The Women’s Resource Center (WRC) provides a full range of services to all students, faculty, & staff who are victims of dating/domestic violence, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, sexual harassment, stalking or childhood abuse. These services include but are not limited to counseling and advocacy (hospital accompaniment, location of safe housing, academic intervention, emergency intake for crisis intervention, help understanding and exploring legal and judicial options, information referrals, and assistance with crime victims’ compensation applications.

University of Alabama strongly encourages individuals who are victims of sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking to report those incidents to the University of Alabama Police Department. UAPD can provide safety planning for victims. Reporting an incident does not require the complainant to take legal action, but might assist UAPD in efforts to stop the criminal. For more safety tips, please see the University of Alabama Police Department Safer Living Guidehttp://police.ua.edu/slg.html.

The University of Alabama School of Law Domestic Violence Law Clinic provides free and comprehensive legal assistance on civil matters to victims of domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault in Tuscaloosa County, AL. There are no income restrictions on qualifying for services from the clinic. The Domestic Violence Law Clinic provides services including representation of the victim in obtaining a protection from abuse order and legal assistance for matters relating to divorce, alimony, child custody, child support, employment issues, debt issues, housing, property recovery, and public benefits.

Victim Advocacy Services 
A victim advocate is on-call 24 hours a day to provide:

  • Hospital accompaniment
  • Location of safe housing
  • Academic intervention with missed classes & exams
  • Emergency intake for crisis intervention on a walk-in basis
  • Help exploring legal & judicial options
  • Information & referrals
  • Assistance with crime victims’ compensation application

Counseling Services

  • Free & confidential individual counseling and therapy
  • Education/support groups
  • Crisis counseling/support for family and friends of victims

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF A TITLE IX INVESTIGATION?
The University of Alabama is committed to providing an environment for employees, students, and campus visitors that is free from illegal harassment and free from discrimination. Therefore, the University will address allegations and suspected instances of discrimination and harassment with a prompt and impartial investigation. The purpose of the investigation is to determine whether conduct has occurred that is in violation of Title IX and University policy, end the harassing or discriminatory conduct, take steps to prevent the recurrence of the harassing or discriminatory conduct with regard to the specific incident and overall University culture, and provide accommodations and/or safety measure to keep the individuals involved in the investigation and the University community as a whole safe. 

WHAT ARE THE INVESTIGATION PROCEDURES FOR A COMPLAINT?
Individuals are encouraged to report violations to the Title IX Coordinator or any Designated Harassment Resource Officer. When a report is received, the University will begin a prompt and thorough investigation, which will include but is not limited to interviewing witnesses and obtaining relevant evidence. The investigator will keep records that are maintained with the Title IX Coordinator. 

  • When a student is accused: The Title IX Office and Office of Student Conduct perform a joint investigation in accordance with the policies set for in the Code of Student Conduct. Students accused of a violation are entitled to a hearing where responsibility and, if applicable, sanctions will be determined by a Hearing Panel.
  • When a faculty or staff member is accused: The Title IX Office (or an appropriate designee, such as a Designated Harassment Resource Person) performs an investigation in accordance with theUniversity’s Harassment Policy.
  • When a community member is accused: The Title IX Office performs an investigation and, if applicable, makes a determination of sanctions based on the best interests of the complainant and the University community as a whole.
    • If the complaint is against a person outside the University (non-employee, non-student), it should be directed to the dean of the college or school if the behavior is occurring in a college or school, to the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs if the behavior is occurring in the work environment outside an academic unit, or to the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs if the complainant is a student.
    • If conflicts or other problems exist with the dean or the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs handling the complaint, the complaint may be filed with the University Compliance Officer in the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs. If conflicts exist with the University Compliance Officer, individuals may consult with the Office of the Provost.
    • The officials listed above, or their appointed designees, will conduct a prompt and appropriate investigation, conducting whatever inquiry they deem necessary, and will arrange conferences with the complainant, the alleged offender, and any other appropriate persons. The investigation, subject to the confidentiality provision above, will afford the accused an opportunity to respond to the allegations. Those directing investigations will make a record of the case, including a record of their decision and any sanctions imposed.

All University Title IX investigations are independent of UAPD or local law enforcement criminal investigations. The University strives to cooperate with law enforcement and may reasonably delay its Title IX investigation to allow for evidence gathering by law enforcement conducting a criminal investigation.

WHERE CAN I FIND UNIVERSITY POLICIES RELATED TO HARASSMENT? 
http://eop.ua.edu/harassment.html
http://www.sc.ua.edu/conduct.pdf
http://police.ua.edu/campus-security-report-2-2/
www.titleix.ua.edu

WHAT IS HARASSMENT? 
Harassment is abusive or hostile conduct which is directed toward or inflicted upon another person because of his or her race, color, religion, ethnicity, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, or veteran status and which, because of its severity or pervasiveness, unreasonably interferes with an individual’s work or academic performance or creates a hostile or abusive work or learning environment for that individual’s work, education, or participation in a University activity.

Harassment is typically based on stereotyped prejudices and includes, but is not limited to, slurs, jokes, objectionable epithets, or other verbal, graphic, or physical conduct that demeans, insults, or intimidates an individual because of his or her race, color, religion, ethnicity, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, or veteran status.

WHAT TYPES OF BEHAVIOR COULD BE CONSIDERED HARASSMENT? 
Harassment that is defined as not being of a sexual nature includes the following:

  • Actions or statements that threaten harm or intimidation to others.
  • An act that invades the privacy of another person.
  • Bullying behaviors, defined as a repeated infliction of physical or psychological distress by way of teasing, social exclusion, threats, intimidation, stalking, violence, theft, harassing communication or destruction of property.
  • Any action or statement via social media, computer or other data network that may be perceived as harmful, threatening, or intimidating.

WHAT TYPES OF BEHAVIOR COULD BE CONSIDERED SEXUAL MISCONDUCT?

  • Sexual Misconduct includes all conduct that is considered sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, intimate partner violence (dating and domestic violence), and stalking. Sexual misconduct creates a threatening, intimidating, and coercive environment.
  • Sexual harassment including unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission to such conduct is made, either explicitly or implicitly, a term or condition of employment or academic advancement; (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment or academic decisions; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s performance as an employee or student or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or learning environment.
  • Sexual assault is any form of sexual contact without the consent of all parties involved to include:
    • a. Sexual intercourse committed by physical force, coercion, threat or intimidation, actual or implied by a person or persons known or unknown to the victim.
    • b. Attempted intercourse, sexual contact, or physical force of a threatening nature expressed or implied that places a person in fear of immediate death or physical injury known or unknown to the victim.
    • c. All other forms of sexual misconduct, that violates state and/or federal law now or subsequently in effect including, but not limited to, conduct defined as rape, sodomy, sexual abuse or sexual contact and contributing to the delinquency of a minor.
  • Sexual exploitation is taking non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for one’s own advantage or benefit or to benefit a person other than the one being exploited.
  • Intimate partner violence (dating and domestic violence) is abusive behavior with the use of threats and intimidation through physical, emotional, verbal, or other abuse in an attempt to exert power and control over a current or former partner.
  • Stalking is an intentional and repeated course of conduct directed at a particular individual because of his/her gender causing a reasonable person to experience fear or emotional distress.

HOW CAN I REPORT HARASSMENT?

  • If this is an emergency or you or someone you know needs assistance immediately, please contact the UA Police Department at 205-348-5454 or 911.
  • Hazing & Harassment Hotline 205-348-HALT (4258)
  • Director of Equal Opportunity Programs / University Compliance Officer, Gwendolyn Hood 171 Rose Administration Building; Box 870300; 205-348-5855
  • Office of the Dean of Students 205-348-3326
  • Office of Student Conduct 205-348-8234; student.conduct@sa.ua.edu
  • Designated Harassment Resource Persons http://eop.ua.edu/persons.html
  • Title IX Coordinator, Beth Howard, 152A Rose Administration Building; Box 870114; 205-348-5496; gbhoward@ua.edu

CAN I REPORT HARASSMENT THAT I THINK IS HAPPENING TO SOMEONE ELSE?
Yes. You should report any suspected harassment that you believe in good faith has occurred or will occur.

CAN I BE PROTECTED FROM RETALIATION FOR MAKING A REPORT?
Yes. It is a violation of the University’s harassment policy and the Student Code of Conduct for any UA employee or student to retaliate against any individual who makes a good faith report of harassment. Any University employee who retaliates against an individual who has made a good faith report of harassment will be subject to disciplinary sanctions, up to and including termination. For more information regarding the University Retaliation policy, see http://eop.ua.edu/harassment.html.

CAN I MAKE AN ANONYMOUS REPORT? 
Yes, you can report harassment anonymously. However, anonymous reports are investigated based on the extent of the information provided and may complicate the University’s ability to take appropriate action to end the harassment, prevent its recurrence, and remediate its effects.

WHAT SAFETY MEASURES OR RESOURCES ARE AVAILABLE TO HELP INDIVIDUALS WHO HAVE EXPERIENCED HARASSMENT?

On-campus counseling and support are available from the following sources:

The Student Health Center and Pharmacy provides medical services for students including a Walk-In Clinic, Women’s Health Services, Laboratory and X-ray, and the University Medical Center Psychiatry Clinic. Individuals who have experienced sexual assault and intimate partner violence are encouraged to seek treatment at DCH Regional Medical Center.

The Women and Gender Resource Center (WGRC) provides a full range of services to all students, faculty and staff who are victims of dating/domestic violence, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, sexual harassment, stalking or childhood abuse. These services include but are not limited to counseling and advocacy (hospital accompaniment, location of safe housing, academic intervention, emergency intake for crisis intervention, help understanding and exploring legal and judicial options, information referrals, and assistance with crime victims’ compensation applications.)

The Counseling Center provides counseling and psychological services to University students for a small fee.

The Employee Assistance Program is a free and confidential employee assistance and counseling program designed to provide University employees and their family members with resources for resolving work-related and personal problems.

The University of Alabama strongly encourages individuals who are victims of sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking to report those incidents to the University of Alabama Police Department by calling 205-348-5454. UAPD can provide safety planning for victims (including location of safe housing) and filing of criminal reports. Reporting an incident does not require the complainant to take legal action, but might assist UAPD in efforts to stop the criminal. For more safety tips, please see the University of Alabama Police Department Safer Living Guidehttp://police.ua.edu/slg.html.

The Title IX Office can provide assistance to complainants and respondents with regard to academic intervention, housing support, employment support, transportation assistance, safety planning (including no contact orders), and referrals to counseling. The Title IX Office can be reached at 205-348-5496.

The University of Alabama School of Law Domestic Violence Law Clinic provides free and comprehensive legal assistance on civil matters to victims of domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault in Tuscaloosa County, AL. There are no income restrictions on qualifying for services from the clinic. The Domestic Violence Law Clinic provides services including representation of the victim in obtaining a protection from abuse order and legal assistance for matters relating to divorce, alimony, child custody, child support, employment issues, debt issues, housing, property recovery, and public benefits. The Clinic may be reached at 205-348-7921.

The Safe Zone Program provides a visible network of volunteers for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) and other individuals seeking information and assistance regarding sexual orientation, gender identity, harassment, and/or discrimination. 
http://dos.ua.edu/safezone.cfm; 205-348-7297; SafeZone@bama.ua.edu