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DEPARTMENT AND PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

CURRICULUM I—BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION1

A total of 124 hours, distributed as follows, are required for the bachelor of science degree.

General Education Courses

Required courses

CoursesHours
CS 1023
EC 110 and EC 111 6
EN 101 and EN 102 6
MATH 112 and MATH 121, or MATH 115 and MATH 1252 6
ST 2603
___
Total: 24
 
Restricted non-commerce electives26–34
 
Natural science. Eight semester hours of science courses designated N, including at least 2 semester hours of laboratory experience.
 
Humanities and fine arts. Twelve semester hours consisting of at least 3 hours of literature* and at least 3 hours in the arts. The remaining 6 hours are to be chosen from the humanities and/or fine arts.
 
History and social and behavioral sciences. Twelve semester hours with at least 3 hours in history* and at least 6 hours chosen from among other disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. EC 110 and EC 111 (required above) satisfy 6 hours of this requirement.
 
*Each student must complete a 6-semester-hour sequence in either literature or history.
 
Foreign language or computer language. Either two semesters of one foreign language designated FL (6–8 hours) or two semesters of C-designated computer language courses (6 hours). This requirement may be satisfied by completing ST 260 and one additional C-designated course.3
___
Total: 50–58 hours
 
Business Administration Functional Field Courses
 
Lower Division
AC 210 Introduction to Accounting4
LGS 200 Legal Environment of Business3
___
Total: 7
 
Upper Division
Applicants for the upper division in the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration must complete at least 61 semester hours prior to admission to the upper division. The 61 hours should be chosen from the requirements listed above and must include degree credit for EC 110 and EC 111; MATH 112 and MATH 121, or MATH 115 and MATH 125; EN 101 and EN 102; CS 102; AC 210; ST 260; and LGS 200 (or their equivalents); and at least 4 hours of natural science, 3 hours of fine arts, literature, or humanities, and 3 hours of history or social and behavioral sciences. Failure to earn degree credit for these specific courses and to earn at least 61 semester hours in all will make students ineligible for admission to the upper division and for enrollment in 300- and 400-level C&BA courses.
 
FI 302 Business Finance3
GBA 490 Strategic Management3
MGT 300 Organizational Theory and Behavior3
MKT 300 Marketing3
MGT 395 Managerial Communication Strategies3
OM 300 Introduction to Operations Management3
___
18
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Total: 25 hours
 
Major Program Courses27
See the departmental listings below for the requirements in each major.
 
Other commerce and non-commerce Electives14–22
GBA 145 Orientation to Commerce and Business Administration
    (highly recommended for students who enter the College
    as freshmen)
 
Some departments may specify some or all of the courses in this elective set. Students should consult officials in their major departments for information.
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Total for B.S. degree: 124 hours

1Most C&BA students select a major program within Curriculum I—Business Administration. Requirements for Curriculum II—Accounting, Curriculum III—Dual Major in Business and Foreign Languages Program, and Curriculum IV—Management Information Systems differ. The requirements for the latter curricula are outlined on subsequent pages.
2Students with the required high-school units in mathematics are classified by means of standardized placement tests; only those with satisfactory placement test scores are admitted to MATH 112. Students who do not make satisfactory scores should complete MATH 100 before taking MATH 112. MATH 100 may be counted toward the degree as a non-commerce elective. In certain cases, students with very weak backgrounds in mathematics may be required to complete MATH 005, which is a noncredit course. Students who concentrate in quantitative finance are required to complete MATH 112, MATH 125, and MATH 126. In all other Curriculum I majors, students are required to complete MATH 112 and MATH 121, or MATH 115 and MATH 125. MATH 125 and MATH 126 are 4-hour courses.
3Foreign language/computer language requirement. Students must complete two semesters (6–8 hours) of a foreign language designated FL or earn equivalent credit by examination; or they must earn 6 semester hours in C-designated courses. Foreign language courses must be selected from non-commerce electives taken to meet the general education requirements. Computer language courses may be selected from either non-commerce or commerce-related electives designated C. Commerce courses with a C designation may not be counted as non-commerce electives.

WORLD BUSINESS CONCENTRATIONS

World business concentrations offered by the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration are specialized programs of study that give the student an opportunity to focus on international aspects of business, including the language and culture of a particular region of the world. World business concentrations are currently offered in six C&BA majors: economics, finance, management, management information systems, marketing, and operations management.

A student selecting a world business concentration must satisfy the basic degree requirements specified under Curriculum I or Curriculum IV, and must also choose his or her courses to include at least three years of foreign language and 6 hours of cross-cultural courses. Students are encouraged to minor in a foreign language when possible.

World business students are also required to participate in a study abroad experience as a part of their program of study. The study abroad experience must be equivalent to a minimum of three semester hours of study and may be obtained in a variety of ways, including a study-abroad interim course, a summer school session abroad, a semester or year of exchange study, an international internship, or an AIESEC traineeship. Students are encouraged to consult with their academic advisor about other possible options for meeting this requirement.

Each student pursuing a world business concentration is required to complete IBA 350 Introduction to World Business as part of the major or as a commerce elective. Other requirements specific to each major are outlined in the sections of this catalog pertaining to that major. Each world business concentration student is also urged to consult with an advisor in the major department at an early date for assistance in choosing cross-cultural courses and other elective courses to build a well-rounded and fully integrated program of study.

SUGGESTED COURSES FOR FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS

The following suggested course sequences for freshman and sophomore PREB (prebusiness) students are intended to assist students in planning their schedules to include the required prebusiness coursework. Academic advisors for C&BA students are available in the A. H. Bean Undergraduate Student Services Center, 10 Bidgood Hall.

Suggested Course Sequence, MATH 100
FRESHMAN YEAR
First Semester
CourseHours
Fine arts elective3
EN 1013
GBA 1451
MATH 1003
History elective*3
Humanities or fine arts elective3
___
16
Second Semester
CourseHours
EC 1103
EN 1023
MATH 1123
CS 1023
Natural science elective4
___
16
 
SOPHOMORE YEAR
First Semester
CourseHours
EC 1113
MATH 121 or MATH 1253
History or social and behavioral sciences elective*3
Literature elective*3
Natural science elective4
___
16
Second Semester
CourseHours
AC 2104
LGS 2003
ST 2603
Free elective(s)3
Literature or humanities/fine arts elective*3
___
16
 
Suggested Course Sequence, MATH 112
 
FRESHMAN YEAR
First Semester
CourseHours
Fine arts elective3
EC 1103
EN 1013
GBA 1451
MATH 1123
History elective*3
___
16
Second Semester
CourseHours
EC 1113
EN 1023
MATH 121 or MATH 1253
CS 1023
Natural science elective4
___
16
 
SOPHOMORE YEAR
First Semester
CourseHours
LGS 2003
History or social and behavioral sciences elective*3
Humanities/fine arts elective3
Literature elective*3
Natural science elective4
___
16
Second Semester
CourseHours
AC 2104
ST 2603
Free electives6
Literature or humanities/fine arts elective*3
___
16

*Each student must complete a 6-semester-hour sequence in either literature or history.

CURRICULUM I MAJOR PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Department of Economics, Finance, and Legal Studies (EC, FI, LGS)

Professor Billy P. Helms, Department Head
Office: 200 Alston Hall

PROGRAMS IN ECONOMICS

The University's economics programs offer an extensive variety of courses to develop the student's analytical abilities and prepare graduates for rewarding careers in business, industry, and government. Economics also provides a sound foundation for postgraduate study in a wide variety of fields. The department offers a major in economics through both C&BA and the College of Arts and Sciences. Students majoring in other fields in C&BA may select economics as a non-commerce minor. Students majoring or minoring in economics are urged to consult the undergraduate advisor for recommendation of 400-level economics courses and general electives consistent with their career goals and objectives. Faculty Advisor: Cover

Major in Economics1
 
Major Program Requirements2
CoursesHours
EC 308 Intermediate Microeconomics33
EC 309 Intermediate Macroeconomics33
EC 389 Computerized Management Information Systems3
EC 450 History of Economic Concepts3
FI 301 Introduction to Financial Institutions and Markets3
Additional EC courses12
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27

1Students may earn credit in economics for courses offered through the American Universities Field Staff (AUFS) Program.
2EC 470 is strongly recommended for those considering graduate work in economics or business.
3A grade of "C" or higher is required in EC 308 and EC 309.

World Business Concentration in International Economics
 
Major Program Requirements*
CoursesHours
EC 308 Intermediate Microeconomics**3
EC 309 Intermediate Macroeconomics**3
EC 389 Computerized Management Information Systems3
EC 430 International Trade 3
EC 431 International Finance3
EC 441 International Financial Management3
EC 450 History of Economic Concepts3
FI 301 Introduction to Financial Institutions and Markets 3
IBA 350 Introduction to World Business 3
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27

*Students in this concentration are advised but not required to take EC 416 and EC 412.
**A grade of "C" or higher is required in EC 308 and EC 309.

DUAL MAJOR IN ECONOMICS AND MATHEMATICS

The dual major in economics and mathematics is for students with strong quantitative skills who want to apply those skills in the field of economics. This curriculum is ideal for students who plan a career that involves forecasting and/or an understanding of formal economic modeling. It also provides students with the mathematical background necessary for pursuing a doctoral degree in economics. Students in this degree program are formally enrolled in the Culverhouse College of Commerce but the curriculum is determined by both the College of Commerce and the College of Arts and Sciences. Faculty Advisor: Cover

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
EC 308 Intermediate Microeconomics*3
EC 309 Intermediate Macroeconomics*3
EC 389 Computerized Management Information Systems3
EC 450 History of Economic Concepts3
EC 471 Econometrics3
EC elective3
FI 301 Financial Institutions and Markets3
MATH 355 Theory of Probability3
MATH 451 Mathematical Statistics I3
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27

**A grade of "C" or higher is required in EC 308 and EC 309.

In addition to the economics major, the following courses are required for the major in mathematics:

CoursesHours
EC 4133
MATH 227 Calculus III4
MATH 237 Applied Matrix Theory or
    MATH 257 Linear Algebra
3
MATH 238 Applied Differential Equations I3
MATH 486 Introduction to Real Analysis I3
MATH elective (300 or 400 level)3
___
19

PROGRAMS IN FINANCE

All students completing requirements for degree programs in finance must complete the finance core courses listed below. In addition, each student in finance must choose one of the following concentrations: banking and financial services; corporate finance and investment management (which is subdivided into four options: financial management, investment management, quantitative finance, and international finance); insurance; or real estate. Students are encouraged to take MATH 125 and MATH 126 instead of MATH 112 and MATH 121. In addition, students considering graduate work should take ST 410 and ST 411. The requirements for each finance concentration are outlined below.

Finance Core Courses*
CoursesHours
EC 308 Intermediate Microeconomics3
EC 309 Intermediate Macroeconomics3
FI 301 Introduction to Financial Institutions and Markets 3
FI 389 Computerized Management Information Systems3
FI 410 Intermediate Financial Management3
FI 412 Money and Capital Markets*3
FI 414 Investments3
___
21

*Students concentrating in financial management, real estate, and insurance have modified finance cores as described in the concentration course requirements below. (See Concentration I–Financial Management, RLES, and INS.)

CONCENTRATION IN BANKING AND FINANCIAL SERVICES (BANK)

The banking and financial services program prepares students for careers in financial institutions like commercial banks and in firms that offer personal financial planning services. Students in the program study the roles of financial institutions in the economy, the workings of the money and capital markets, and the interrelationship of financing and investment decisions. After completing a core of basic finance courses covering investments, financial management, bank administration, and money and capital markets, students may choose from a number of electives or may take specific courses which will enable them to sit for the Certified Financial Planner (CFP™) examination(s). Faculty Advisors: Gup, Ligon, and McLeod

Major Program Requirements*
CoursesHours
Finance core courses21
FI 341 Personal Insurance Planning3
FI 421 Bank Administration 3
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27

*Students who are interested in sitting for the Certified Financial Planner (CFP™) examination(s) should take the following courses or their equivalents as electives: AC 371 Introduction to Taxation; LGS 403 Administration of Estates and Trusts; and FI 444 Life and Health Insurance.

The University of Alabama does not certify individuals to use the CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, and CFP (with flame logo)® certification marks. CFP certification is granted only by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. to those persons who, in addition to completing an educational requirement such as this CFP Board Registered Program, have met ethics, experience, and examination requirements.

CONCENTRATION IN CORPORATE FINANCE AND INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT (CFIM)

Option I—Financial Management.* The financial management program is designed to provide broad professional competence to students preparing for executive positions in the financial management of business enterprises and government agencies. The program involves intensive study of the modern theory of finance and its applications to (a) the management of corporate and public funds; (b) the behavior of securities prices; and (c) the relationship between financial markets and business enterprise. Faculty Advisors: Agrawal, Brooks, Carroll, Downs, Helms, Ligon, McLeod, and Page

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
FI 410 Intermediate Financial Management3
FI 411 Corporate Financial Policy3
FI 412 Money and Capital Markets3
FI 413 Working Capital Management3
FI 414 Investments3
AC 310 Financial Reporting and Analysis of Business Activities I3
AC 311 Financial Reporting and Analysis II3
AC 361 Cost Analysis for Planning and Control3
AC 389 Accounting Information Systems Development,
    Operation, and Control
3
___
27

*Students who choose this option must complete one additional 300- or 400-level accounting course and EC 308 as electives.

Option II—Investment Management*. The investment management program provides broad professional competence to students preparing for positions in investment management. The program involves intensive study of the modern theory of finance and its applications to (a) the behavior of securities prices; (b) portfolio management; and (c) the relationship between financial markets and business enterprise. Faculty Advisors: Agrawal, Brooks, Carroll, Downs, Helms, Ligon, McLeod, Page, and Schlesinger

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
Finance core courses21
FI 415 Advanced Investments3
FI 419 Financial Engineering3
___
27

*Students who choose this option must take AC 351 or AC 352 as an elective.

Option III—Quantitative Finance*. This program is for students who plan to work in positions requiring financial planning, investment analysis, and portfolio management at an advanced technical level. This program is suggested for students thinking of entering M.A., M.B.A., or Ph.D. programs as part of their career objectives. Faculty Advisors: Agrawal, Brooks, Carroll, Downs, Helms, Ligon, McLeod, Page, and Schlesinger

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
Finance core courses21
ST 410 Concepts of Probability3
ST 411 Statistical Inference3
___
27

*Students who choose this option must take MATH 125 and MATH 126 to satisfy the basic math requirement. In addition, they must take as electives MATH 227, MATH 253, MATH 255 (or their equivalents), and EC 413 Forecasting.

Option IV—World Business Concentration in International Finance*. The international finance program provides broad professional competence to those preparing for executive positions in multinational firms or staff positions in the international departments of major banks. The program involves intensive study of international trade, markets, and accounting conventions. Faculty Advisors: Agrawal, Helms, McLeod, and Schlesinger

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
Finance core courses 21
FI 431 International Finance3
FI 441 International Financial Management3
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27

*Students in this concentration must complete as electives EC 430 International Economics and IBA 350 Introduction to World Business.

CONCENTRATION IN REAL ESTATE (RLES)

Real estate students will find themselves concerned with real estate investments, the management and development of land, real estate appraisal, real estate financing, and brokerage or sales. Career opportunities are available in the lending departments of financial institutions, in real estate sales, in urban planning, and in the numerous government agencies that specialize in housing. Faculty Advisor: Zumpano

Major Program Requirements
Modified Finance Core
CoursesHours
EC 308 Intermediate Microeconomics3
EC 309 Intermediate Macroeconomics3
FI 301 Introduction to Financial Institutions and Markets 3
FI 389 Computerized Management Information Systems3
 
Real Estate Core
FI 331 Principles of Real Estate3
FI 334 Introduction to Real Estate Property Management or
    FI 410 Intermediate Financial Management
3
FI 432 Real Estate Appraisal or FI 414 Investments3
FI 436 Real Estate Finance3
LGS 407 Real and Personal Property Law3
___
27

Students concentrating in real estate should consider choosing their electives from the following courses: FI 421 Bank Administration, AC 371 Income Tax, MKT 371 Site Selection and Market Area Analysis, and CET 467 Construction Cost Estimating.

CONCENTRATION IN INSURANCE (INS)

Persons in the insurance field need to understand risks and the methods of financing them. They need to know how insurance companies and agencies operate, what insurance contracts cover, and how the industry responds to the many problems it faces. Graduates of the insurance program find employment openings not only in the insurance field, but also in financial, industrial, and commercial organizations concerned with problems of risk management. Faculty Advisor: Schlesinger

Major Program Requirements
Modified Finance Core
CoursesHours
EC 308 Intermediate Microeconomics3
EC 309 Intermediate Macroeconomics3
FI 301 Introduction to Financial Institutions and Markets 3
FI 389 Computerized Management Information Systems3
 
Insurance Core
FI 341 Personal Insurance Planning3
Four of the following:
    FI 410 Intermediate Financial Management
    FI 412 Money and Capital Markets
    FI 414 Investments
    FI 442 Business Risk Management
    FI 443 Property and Liability Insurance
    FI 444 Life and Health Insurance12
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27

DUAL MAJOR IN FINANCE AND MATHEMATICS

The dual major in finance and mathematics is for students with strong quantitative skills who want to apply those skills in the field of finance. This curriculum is ideal for students who plan a career that requires an understanding of financial modeling or intend to go to graduate school. Students in this degree program are formally enrolled in the Culverhouse College of Commerce but the curriculum is determined by both the College of Commerce and the College or Arts and Sciences. Faculty Advisors: Brooks, Helms, Page, and Schlesinger.

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
EC 308 Intermediate Microeconomics3
EC 309 Intermediate Macroeconomics3
FI 301 Introduction to Financial Institutions and Markets3
FI 410 Intermediate Financial Markets3
FI 389 Computerized Management Information Systems3
FI 412 Money and Capital Markets3
FI 414 Investments3
MATH 355 Theory of Probability3
MATH 451 Mathematical Statistics with Applications I3
___
27

In addition to the finance major, the following courses are required for the major in mathematics:

CoursesHours
EC 413 Economic Forecasting and Analysis3
MATH 227 Calculus III4
MATH 237 Applied Matrix Theory or
    MATH 257 Linear Algebra
3
MATH 238 Applied Differential Equations I3
MATH 486 Introduction to Real Analysis I3
MATH elective (300 or 400 level)3
___
19

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARS PROGRAM IN FINANCE

The University Scholars Program in Finance allows students to pursue graduate and undergraduate degrees in finance concurrently. The graduate degree is the master of science in finance (M.S.F.). With careful planning, a student should be able to complete both degrees in four years. This program primarily serves students who have exceptional ability and are undergraduate majors in finance. Material in some of the senior-level classes will be covered in the master's-level classes.

Enrollment
Phase I

During the sophomore year ( in some cases students might have junior standing), students should consult with a faculty member in finance about the University Scholars Program. Exceptional students should give strong consideration to this program. Selection criteria will include

  1. a GPA of 3.5 or higher
  2. advanced math classes (at least MATH 125 and, ideally, through linear algebra)
  3. an expected GMAT score of 650 or higher
  4. a strong interest in a finance or academic career

Phase II

Students who meet these criteria should take the GMAT exam and complete the application process. Admission to Phase II will require completion of at least 97 undergraduate credit hours, a GPA of 3.5 or higher, completion of at least three-quarters of the hours required for the major and minor, and completion of all core curriculum requirements. During the senior year, the student will take graduate courses which will count toward both the bachelor's and master's degrees. Following completion of 124 hours, the student will receive the undergraduate degree. Following receipt of the undergraduate degree, the student will continue taking graduate courses until requirements for the M.S.F. degree are met.

Typical Schedule of Coursework

  1. Freshman Year—Same coursework as all freshmen except many students will probably come with credit for a large part of their first-year classes. Most will also be taking more advanced math classes than the typical student. The general education requirement of the C&BA curriculum will be taken in the freshman year.
  2. Sophomore Year—Students will take typical sophomore classes. All core curriculum requirements and lower-division functional field classes required by C&BA will be completed in the sophomore year.
  3. Junior Year—At least three-quarters of the courses for the undergraduate finance degree will be completed. These include FI 301, FI 302, FI 389, FI 414, GBA 490, MGT 300, MGT 395, MKT 300, OM 300, and 6 elective hours.
  4. Senior year (after admission to Phase II)—Students will take classes that will count toward both the bachelor's and master's degrees.

Required graduate coursework for the University Scholars Program in Finance includes EC 508, EC 509, EC 513, FI 510, FI 512, FI 515, FI 522, and 9 hours of electives. The M.S.F. degree will be awarded after all 30 credit hours are completed.

Department of Information Systems, Statistics, and Management Science (MIS, OM, ST)

Professor Michael D. Conerly, Department Head
Office: 300 Alston Hall

PROGRAM IN OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT*

Operations management (OM) focuses on the effective management of the resources and activities that produce and deliver the goods and services of any business. OM professionals manage the people, materials, equipment, and information resources that a business needs to produce and deliver its goods and services. They also design and manage the business processes and activities that actually produce those goods or services. Business operations are a critical element of every business, so there is a wide range of opportunities for OM professionals. Manufacturing management has been and continues to be a significant area of opportunity. The tremendous growth of the automotive industry in the state of Alabama has produced great job opportunities for OM professionals with major automobile manufacturers and their suppliers. OM professionals can also pursue careers in the distribution and warehousing of products as well as transportation and logistics operations. In fact the entire field of supply chain management relies heavily on the effective management and coordination of business operations, from manufacturing to transportation and distribution. Whether products that are sold in the U.S. are manufactured overseas or in the U.S., at least some part of the supply chain must be operated and managed in the U.S. The growth of service industries in the state, such as banking, also provides opportunities for OM professionals to manage business operations in service-oriented companies. OM professionals hold a wide range of different job titles, such as materials manager, production planner, scheduler, inventory manager, transportation/logistics manager, purchasing/procurement manager, supply chain manager, and quality manager. However, they all employ OM techniques and concepts to effectively manage the resources and processes of their business operations. Because OM professionals are familiar with the resources and operations that are critical to success, they are often well-positioned for promotion to upper levels of business management.

Faculty Advisors: Sox and Weaver
Academic Advisor: Heather Davis

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
OM 310 Introduction to Management Science3
OM 321 Production Planning and Control3
OM 385 Information Technology for Operations Management3
OM 420 Computer Simulation3
OM 422 Operations Scheduling 3
OM 423 Inventory Management3
ST 475 Statistical Quality Control or
    OM 425 Effective Quality Management
3
Two OM restricted electives6
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27

*A world business concentration in operations management has been approved. Please consult the department for details.

Department of Management and Marketing (MGT, MKT)

Professor Rob Morgan, Department Head
Office: 104 Alston Hall

PROGRAM IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT

The bachelor of science in commerce and business administration with a major in health care management equips students to apply business administration and management knowledge in health care organizations. Faculty Advisors: Davis, Savage, Williams

Major Program Requirements
CoursesHours
MGT 301 Introduction to Human Resources Management3
MGT 320 Leadership3
CS 285 Microcomputer Applications II or
    MKT 385 Marketing Information Systems
3
HCM 370 Introduction to Health Systems3
HCM 371 Analysis of Health Care Systems3
HCM 473 Survey of Issues in Health Care Management3
HCM 492 Internship3
One elective chosen from the following:
    HCM 475 Principles of Managed Health Care
    HCM 476 Principles of Long Term Care
    HCM 477 Principles of Ambulatory Care Management
    MKT 337 Personal Selling3
One elective chosen from the following:
    GBA 322 Effective Negotiations
    IBA 350 Introduction to World Business
    LGS 472 Legal Aspects of Health Care
    MGT 386 Foundations of Entrepreneurship
    MGT 406 Family Business3
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27

PROGRAMS IN MANAGEMENT

Management is a major that focuses on the crucial processes by which the resources of an organization are systematically directed toward the achievement of its mission. Management majors gain the flexibility to apply their skills in a variety of settings. Some graduates work in international management. Others go to work in small business environments; still others begin their professional careers as management trainees in large organizations. Management students can elect to concentrate in one of three areas: management, entrepreneurship and small company management, or international management.

CONCENTRATION I—MANAGEMENT

The purpose of this option is to develop in the student a broad range of knowledge and skills for managing a business organization. This is an ideal program for the student who wants to enter a general management training program within a large organization. Faculty Advisors: Bachrach, Campbell, Cashman, Dulek, Johnson, Kachmar, Lohrke, Marino, Powell, Scott, and Strickland

Concentration Requirements
CoursesHours
MGT 301 Introduction to Human Resources Management3
MGT 320 Leadership3
CS 285 Microcomputer Applications II or
    MKT 385 Marketing Information Systems
3
IBA 350 Introduction to World Business3
MGT 386 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship3
MGT 420 Organizational Change3
MGT 421 Managerial Analysis3
Two electives chosen from the following:
    GBA 322 Effective Negotiations
    MGT 492 Internship in Human Resources Management
    HCM 370 Introduction to Health Systems
    MKT 473 Marketing Research
    C&BA elective(s) approved by MGT faculty advisor6
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27

CONCENTRATION II—ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL COMPANY MANAGEMENT

The purpose of the entrepreneurship and small company management program is to provide the knowledge and leadership skills necessary to manage small and medium-sized enterprises in an entrepreneurial mode. Skills are developed in a series of courses and experiences covering the fundamentals of entrepreneurship, small business management, new venture development, and the management of rapid-growth businesses. The program is designed for individuals who want to establish their own businesses, enter existing growth-oriented firms, join in managing family businesses, or operate in an entrepreneurial manner within large corporations. Faculty Advisors: Lohrke, Marino, and Powell

Concentration Requirements
CourseHours
MGT 301 Introduction to Human Resources Management3
MGT 320 Leadership3
CS 285 Microcomputer Applications II or
    MKT 385 Marketing Information Systems
3
IBA 350 Introduction to World Business3
MGT 386 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship3
MGT 406 Family Business3
MGT 486 Small Business Consulting Field Project3
Two electives chosen from the following:
    GBA 322 Effective Negotiations
    MGT 482 New Venture Development
    MKT 410 Product Development
    C&BA elective(s) approved by MGT faculty advisor6
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27

CONCENTRATION III—WORLD BUSINESS CONCENTRATION IN INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT

The basic requirements for students concentrating in international management are the same as for other Curriculum I students, except that international management majors choose their humanities electives in a geopolitical concentration and must choose a foreign language rather than computer science to satisfy the University Core Curriculum language requirement. Available geopolitical concentrations are Europe, the Pacific Rim, and Latin America. The University offers a wide range of courses from which to choose, so that international management students may become familiar with the history and culture of these regions. The University also offers courses in most of the major languages spoken in these regions. The student is encouraged to minor in the language he or she chooses to study. Students should consult the management or international management faculty advisors for details of the program and a complete list of humanities and language options. Faculty Advisors: Hill and Hilton

Concentration Requirements
CoursesHours
MGT 301 Introduction to Human Resources Management3
MGT 320 Leadership3
CS 285 Microcomputer Applications II or
    MKT 385 Marketing Information Systems
3
IBA 350 Introduction to World Business3
MGT 386 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship3
Concentration courses*6
300-level language study or approved international
    business electives (e.g., courses listed below)
6
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27

*The following are recommended concentration course sequences:
International management: MGT/IBA 351 Multinational Business Communications, MGT/IBA 459 Seminar in International Management
International marketing: MKT 455 International Marketing, MKT/IBA 460 Export/Import Management
International political-economic systems: PSC 434 International Political Economy, EC 453 Comparative Economic Systems
International economics/finance: Any two from EC 430 International Trade, FI 431 International Finance, FI 441 International Financial Management (to take EC 430 and/or FI 431, the student must first successfully complete the prerequisite course EC 308)

PROGRAMS IN MARKETING

Marketing is concerned with (1) the identification and assessment of consumer and industrial market needs and (2) the development of marketing programs to satisfy those needs. Marketing personnel in profit and nonprofit organizations analyze markets and industries to define new and refine existing opportunities. Marketers are also responsible for developing and managing products, promotional programs, distribution systems, and prices that are appropriate to the targeted market opportunities. Students who major in marketing enjoy a wide range of employment opportunities. Entry-level opportunities exist in sales and sales management, retail management, product and brand management, market research, advertising, distribution and logistics, purchasing, and other areas. The marketing curriculum offers three specializations: consumer marketing, supply chain management, and international marketing. Each specialization can lead to productive and profitable marketing careers. Faculty Advisors: Allaway, Beatty, Davis, D'Souza, Ellinger, Franke, Hill, Morgan, Motes, Mothersbaugh, Reynolds, and Richey

Major Program Requirements

Each marketing major is required to earn a "C-" or better in all courses (27 hours) in the major. Also, on the advice of a marketing faculty member, a marketing major may count one Interim session course as a marketing elective in the major program.

CoursesHours
MKT 313 Buyer Behavior 3
MKT 337 Personal Selling3
MKT 385 Marketing Information Systems3
MKT 411 Supply Chain Management3
MKT 473 Marketing Research3
MKT 487 Strategic Marketing 3
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CONCENTRATION I—CONSUMER MARKETING

Consumer marketing is a program of preparation that students interested in sales, sales management, or retail management should consider. Sales careers in consumer- and industrial-goods industries offer many attractive opportunities. Retailers hire marketing students for sales, management, and merchandising career paths. Faculty Advisors: Allaway, Beatty, Davis, D'Souza, Ellinger, Franke, Mothersbaugh, and Reynolds.
Required Courses
CoursesHours
Major program required core18
Choose three of the following electives:
    MKT 310 Introduction to Electronic Commerce
    MKT 321 Retail Management
    MKT 410 Product Development
    MKT 444 Promotional Management
    MKT 455 International Marketing
    MKT 488 Field Project in Marketing9
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CONCENTRATION II—SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

The integration of transportation, inventory management, warehousing and materials handling across the entire chain to achieve effective and efficient distribution is a major focus in modern organizations. The supply chain refers to the flow of goods from raw material sources to manufacturer to wholesaler/distributor to consumer or end-user and the flow of information in the opposite direction. Students with this concentration are prepared with strategic and operational knowledge that enables them to pursue careers in logistics and supply chain management in manufacturing, wholesaling, retailing, and in other organizations. Faculty Advisors: Allaway, Davis, Ellinger, Morgan, and Richey

Required Courses
CoursesHours
Major program required core18
MKT 321 Retail Management3
MKT 422 Logistics Management3
Choose one of the following electives:
    MKT 310 Introduction to Commerce
    MKT 455 International Marketing
    MKT 488 Field Project in Marketing3
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CONCENTRATION III—WORLD BUSINESS CONCENTRATION IN INTERNATIONAL MARKETING

The international marketing program has been designed for students of marketing who are interested in entering the global arena. Faculty Advisors: Hill and Hilton

Required Courses
CoursesHours
Major program requirements12*
IBA 350 Introduction to World Business3
MKT 455 International Marketing3
MKT 460 Export-Import Management3
300-level language study or
    approved international business electives
6
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*Choose any four of the six marketing major program requirement (core) courses.

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